Service Men - Cadwallader - Christie

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71 - Cadwallader, J.L. (Jack) - Private Canadian Army Overseas
(PH002337) (Jack on right; Bill Gallagher on left)
- Jul/44, p.2 – “Keeping…company is Jack Cadwallader, who will be married shortly to a Nanaimo lassie.”
- Feb/45, p.1 – “Just as we go to press we hear the following have arrived overseas…Pte. J. Cadwallader, K-92351…”
- Mar/45, p.3 – (in a letter from Mike Belyk) “…There are three other Powell River lads here, Dave Jack, Bill Jamieson and Jack Cadwallader.”
72 - Cairney, Henry/Hugh/Hank - Private
- Vol.16/1940/No.10-Oct. p.7 – (picture caption) “Hank Cairney, now in England with the New Zealand infantry.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.5-May. p.10 – “Shortly before going to press with this issue, word was received that Henry (Hank) Cairney, on active service with the New Zealanders, had been wounded in action.Hank is Powell River’s first battle casualty. While he did not enlist from Powell River he was brought up in the district, went to school here, and took an important part in our athletic life. Hank left Powell River for New Zealand shortly before the outbreak of war. He joined up immediately after the declaration and went overseas last summer. Word received from his parents indicates Hank was wounded in the recent heavy fighting in the Middle East.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “…News has come through of the safe arrival in England of Canada’s Third Division…includ(ing) the 1
st Battalion Canadian Scottish, whose nominal roll includes twenty-two Powell River boys. Among these (is) Hughie Cairney…” (note: given the entry above, this may be “James” not “Hugh” Cairney.)
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.8 – “Twenty-two Powell River representatives are numbered in the ranks of the First Canadian Battalion, Canadian Scottish, Third Division. They include such stalwarts as Pte. Hugh Cairney…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.24 – “Among the wounded in Greece was Hank Cairney, well known Powell River atthlete and schoolboy. Hank left for New Zealand just before the outbreak of the war. He joined up immediately with the New Zealanders, fought in Egypt and Libya, and was severely wounded in Greece. He was invalided back to New Zealand, and it is now learned he has been discharged from the forces. Latest advices indicate Hank will return to the old stamping ground when the opportunity presents itself.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.2-Feb. p.16 – “We received word this week that Hank Cairney, former Powell River athlete and schoolboy, who enlisted with the New Zealand forces, is back in Vancouver. Hank was severely wounded in Greece and was returned to hospital in New Zealand, where he spent many months recuperating. He is now in Vancouver, staying with his parents, on indefinite leave. He and two others were the only survivors of a party that fought through the earliest stages of the Grecian expedition.”
- May/43, p.4 – (in a letter from Bill Clutterbuck) “The Powell River boys in the Scottish are all o.k. Hugh Cairney will be away for a while. He has a bit of stomach trouble and is now with the Holding Unit.”
- Aug/43, p.2 – (K-57488), No. 6 Coy., CFC, Overseas “Please thank the Powell River Company for the cigarettes and the Monthly News Letter.It sure is a good idea. Well, here I am up in the Highlands beside the Spey River in the land of the mountains and Haros. Buster McNeil is here and has just finished pitching a ball game for our Coy. We won. Also tell Tom Prentice I saw the Light Blues playing against St. Mirren.”
- Mar/44, p.3 – (in a letter from W.E. Peebles) “Would like to know what Hugh Cairney (is) doing now. {…Hugh Cairney came back to Canada with a Forestry draft – he is now logging near Powell River.}”
- Apr/44, p.3 – “…Hugh Cairney (is) in Powell River.”
- Jul/44, p.3 – “Hugh Cairney, who returned with a Forestry Group about six months ago, has been discharged and is back in the mill again.”
- Jun/45, p.1 – “About 15 have been discharged in the past month…(including) Hugh Cairney (Wharf).”
73 – Cairney, James - Private
- Vol.17/1941/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “…News has come through of the safe arrival in England of Canada’s Third Division…includ(ing) the 1st Battalion Canadian Scottish, whose nominal roll includes twenty-two Powell River boys. Among these (is) Hughie Cairney…” (note: given the entry above, this may be “James” not “Hugh” Cairney.)
74 - Calder, W.B. (Bill) - Pilot Officer RCAF Overseas
- Vol.18/1942/No.7-Jul. p.13 – “…Billy Calder of the office…received (his) wings as sergeant pilot…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.7-Jul. p.13 – “Summer and embarkation leaves are bringing manyy of the boys back home for brief and well earned holidays…Bill Calder (is) among the lads who have been with us in recent weeks.”
- May/43, p.1 – “And a late flash that Sgt. Pilot Bill Calder has just been married.”
- Jan/44, p.5 – “Flash! Pilot Officer Bill Calder popped into town today with a brand new wife.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.3-Mar. p.12 – (photo caption) “Sgt.-Pilot Bill Calder helps Mrs. Calder cut the wedding cake. Bill was recently married in Alberta.”
- Jun/44, p.1 – “Billy Calder (J-45642), now Overseas is an officer and a gentleman, by crackey, and it’s Pilot Officer Bill Calder for the next few months.”
- Aug/44, p.3 – (in a letter from R. Furness) “Had a letter from Bill Calder the other day. He just got over (P.O. Calder, W.B., J 45642 RCAF Overseas) a few weeks ago.”
75 - Caldicott, James (Jimmy) - CPO RCNVR
- Feb/44, p.1 – “…and the bos’uns mate has piped Jimmy Caldicott up to Chief P.O.”
76 - Campbell, Doug - Flying Officer RCAF Overseas
- Apr/43, p.1 – “Doug Campbell is a Pilot Officer.”
- Jan/44, p.2 – “And Doug Campbell, who had a real hilarious reunion with his old pals, Martin Naylor and Flt. Sgt. Frankie Mannion, seemed to benefit from the experience. About two weeks later they made him a Flying Officer.”
- May/45, p.2 – “Two old pals returned a couple of weeks ago, Hap Parker and Doug. Campbell. Both waiting discharge…and Doug is as sprightly as ever.”
77 - Campbell, E. (Ernie) - Private CTAC -Chilliwack, BC
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Vol.16/1940/No.8-Aug. p.5/16 – “And from Gunner Ernest Campbell, formerly of the office staff, comes several letters written in Ernie’s own inimitable style. He tells us: “Well, here I am, a blasted soldier. We have been marching all day over the parade ground, being taught how and who to salute, etc. I really am enjoying it.”…“Here I am again confined to barracks with a sorte arm. Got vaccinated and inoculated today, so no drill or PT.”… “We had quite a reunion here. Five Powell River boys all got together-Jack Carr, Charlie MacIntosh, Chuck Couvelier, Sandy Strachan and myself. About all we could do was have our pictures taken.”… “It’s hotter than Hades here in the east. I’m as black as a nigger.”
-Vol.16/1940/No.8-Aug. p.16 – “Bert Southcott, of the Sulphite Department, finally received his call as an air gunner and departed eastward, all smiles, to join his pal Ernie Campbell.”
- Feb/43, p.2 – Chilliwack, B.C. “This amp is on the road between Sardis and Cultus Lake and some day will be on e of the finest situated camps in Canada. The food is excellent and is served up in a most appetizing manner. A platoon is assigned to each table and a table orderly from each platoon carries the food from the kitchen. I’m eating like a horse and putting on weight.”
- Apr/43, p.4 – “We wish to acknowledge and thank…Pte. Ernie Campbell...for (his) nice letter.”
- Apr/43, p.5 – “…and Ernie Campbell is with the gunners at Shilo.”
- May/43, p.5 - “We thank the scores of boys who have written us and are only sorry we can’t include all your letters. We hope to get around to most of them some time. Meantime we would like to acknowledge letters from…Ernie Campbell…”
- Aug/43, p.1 – “And Gunner Ernie Campbell has hurdled the first post and is now Lance Bombardier.”
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78 - Campbell, Jock - Private Canadian Army Overseas
(PH002351)
- Vol.17/1941/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “…News has come through of the safe arrival in England of Canada’s Third Division…includ(ing) the 1st Battalion Canadian Scottish, whose nominal roll includes twenty-two Powell River boys. Among these (is) Jack [sic] Campbell…”
- Vol.16/1940/No.9-Sep. p.6 – “Jock Campbell, finishing room and vetern of the last war, popped into town last week with 20 pounds extra weight and looking fitter than fiddles. He delivered impromptu lectures on the Bren and Lewis guns, and took the new drill in his stride. Jock is with the Canadian Scottish in Victoria, along with a large crowd of Powell River boys, including Jimmy Jacobs, Rusty Taylor, Joe Hugh Carney, Joe Tash, Hock Pelley, George and Bill Crockett, Colin McLauchlan and many others.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.5-May. p.11 – “Jock Campbell is still interested in concert and theatrical work…All the boys from Debert send their regards to Powell River and wish to thank the folks for the parcels and smokes.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.4-Apr. p.10 – “Jock Campbell of the Canadian Scottish, received his parcel [of the Company’s gift of 2000 cigarettes] just as he was boarding the train for seven days’ leave.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.8 – “Twenty-two Powell River representatives are numbered in the ranks of the First Canadian Battalion, Canadian Scottish, Third Division. They include such stalwarts as Pte. Jock Campbell…”
- Jul/43, p.3 – (in a letter from D.A. Jack) “How’s old man Campbell? Can’t keep us old timers down, eh Jock!”
- Feb/44, p.2 – (re: marriages) “…the top rumor of the month is a report that Jock Campbell has been finally trapped, after dodging some cannily set snares over the past twenty years.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.3-Mar. p.12 – “We have had definite word about many Overseas marriages-but it’s the ones that are still in the doubtful class that worry and intrigue us. The latest prospect, for example, is Jock Campbell. However, as Jock philosophically remarks, “I’ve had a pretty good run” – and what more can a man ask for?”
79 - X Carey, A.M. (Bert) – PO RCAF Atlantic Ferry Co
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Vol.16/1940/No.2-Feb. p.7 – This month’s personality page flutters around the moguls of Powell River indoor sport pastimes. For No. 1 we present Bert Carey of the Shipping Department, main office. For years Bert has been a leader in the local badminton world, and his energy and leadership has much to do with the club’s present favorite position. Bert’s ability has now been recognized beyond the confines of the townsite. At a meeting held in Nanaimo recently he was elected President of the newly-formed Upper Island Badminton Association, an organization which embraces Powell River on the mainland, and all clubs north of Nanaimo on Vancouver Island. Bert has been singles champion of the division for the past two years, and has been pressing for a more compact organization, affiliated with the Britiah Columbia Association.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.3-Mar. p.3 – “The Commonwealth Air Training schools are turning out more and more pilots, observerrs and gunners. Recent graduates include…Pilot Officer Bert Carey…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.10-Oct. p.8 – “And there is Pilot Officer Bert Carey, formerly of the Sales and Shipping Office, and now with the Ferry Command. Bert saw Bat McIntrye in London. A few weeks later he was strolling down the streets of Cairo and other African way points. A couple of days after that he was looking over Montreal’s night clubs.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.11-Nov. p.11 – (under “We Will Remember Them”)
“PO Carey, Bert
RCAF Dec ’42
North Atlantic, Ferrying Bombers.”
- Jul/46, p13 - “How well we remember these lads, because they were first in battle and were in our minds and hearts for so long…(including) Bert Carey, last heard somewhere in the North Atlantic…- all youngsters, who were part and parcel of our community and athletic life, were sucked up in the tempest.”
80 – Carney, Joe Hugh
- Vol.16/1940/No.9-Sep. p.6 – “Jock Campbell…is with the Canadian Scottish in Victoria, along with a large crowd of Powell River boys, including Jimmy Jacobs, Rusty Taylor, Joe Hugh Carney, Joe Tash, Hock Pelley, George and Bill Crockett, Colin McLauchlan and many others.”
81 - Carr, Jack – Flight Lieutenant RCAF
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Vol.16/1940/No.8-Aug. p.5 – “From an Air Training camp in the east, Jack Carr, of the Machine Room, goes through the paces as a future RCAF pilot. In this camp are pilots, gunners and observers from every corner of the Dominion and from outside the Dominion. Jack, in a recent letter, tells of his first meeting with a few of the lads from across the border who came north to get into the scrap. He says: “There are a fine bunch of fellows here. They come from all over the country, and from the States too. There are several Americans here, and they sho’ talk it. One fellow from West Virginia is going as a gunner. We asked him why he wasn’t going to try for pilot. He said, “Boy, when Ah’m up theya and the Germans stawt aftu’ me, I doan’ want to be bothud with no joystick, just give me a gun.” I get a kick out of listening to them. Met another in a restaurant yesterday, and caught myself talking like him. They are a swell bunch, though, and very witty and sharp with any comments.”
-Vol.16/1940/No.8-Aug. p.5/16 – “We had quite a reunion here. Five Powell River boys all got together-Jack Carr, Charlie MacIntosh, Chuck Couvelier, Sandy Strachan and myself (Ernest Campbell). About all we could do was have our pictures taken.”
- Vol.16/1940/No.11-Nov. p.14 – “From Goderich, Ontario, comes word that Jack Carr of the machine room is now doing solo flying and is well on the road to receiving the coveted RCAF “Wings”.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.1-Jan. p.9 – “Many other RCAF lads are also in the stretch. Jack Carr has been doing solo for many weeks…”
- Vol.17/1941/No.2-Feb. p.1 – “Elsewhere in this issue, it is noted that Sergeant Jack Carr was home on a brief furlough. Jack holds the high honor of being the first Powell River boy to gain the coveted RCAF “wings”. Jack is the forerunner of scores of other local lads who will soon be passing through the great Empire Air Training Schools.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.3-Mar. p.10 – “Last month Jack Carr slipped off the boat on a shore leave from his RCAF headquarters in the east. He proudly wore the three stripes of a sergeant pilot, with the coveted Air Force wings on his chest. Jack is the first Powell River member of the RCAF to graduate from the Empire Training Schools.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.7-Jul. p.6 – “Powell River’s quota of graduated pilots has now been increased to six-…Sergeant-Pilot Jack Carr having already passed (his) final tests.”
- May/43, p.3 – (in a letter from Vince Forbes) “Also saw Jack Carr but don’t know where he is now [he is Pilot Officer Jack Carr, last heard of at Patricia Bay].”
- Jan/44, p.3 – “…and Flying Officer Jack Carr is now up at Alliford Bay, where he has P.O. Dawson Pirie to play crib with.”
- Mar/44, p.3 – “Flying Officer Jack Carr is still at Alliford Bay where he was joined by Sgt. Sandy Strachan last October.”
- May/44, p.3 - “Flying Officer Jack Carr is still at Alliford Bay…”
- Mar/45, p.1 – “Jack Carr, after instructing all the way from Halifax to Par Bay and back, has been upped to Flight Looie. Address: CAPO #4, RCAF Overseas (Newfoundland).”
82 - Carrie, James - Signalman
- Apr/43, p.5 - “Recent enlistments around town include…James Carrie…”
83 - Carroll, P.J. (Pat) - Private Artillery Park
- Mar/44, p.3 – “Pat Carroll, the old portsider, is still driving trucks at Barriefield, Ontario…”
- May/44, p.3 - “Pat Carroll, the old portsider, is at Barriefield.”
84 - Carruthers, Bert
- Feb/45, p.1 – “Bert Carruthers, with a suit-case loaded with swag from eight permits is meeting…in Vancouver.
85 - Carruthers, Henry (Hank) - AB RCNVR
- Vol.18/1942/No.2-Feb. p.8 – “A typical letter comes from Hank Carruthers, who with the entrance of Japan into the war, was suddenly dragged from his training school in Vancouver and sent out to assist in rounding up the Jap fishing fleet. Hank writes: “Thanks very much on behalf of myself and the many moochers which are always hanging around. When the Japs came in, a bunch of us dry land sailors were suddenly sent to sea to grab Jap fishing vessels. I left my cigarettes ashore, because if that crowd of moochers ever got me alone on a fishing boat, I’d be rolling my own again in two days.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.2-Feb. p.9 – “The Navy called another two well-known brothers-Hank and Jack Carruthers, both at sea somewhere off the Pacific coast.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “In the ranks of the bluejackets are scores of former employees, well known throughout the district. There is…Jack and Hank Carruthers…worthy of the tradition handed down and maintained by the Royal Navy.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.7-Jul. p.10 – “Somewhere in the vicinity on (a) Canadian or British destroyer (was) AB Hank Carruthers…”
- Jul/46, p.7 - “Canadian destroyers and corvettes sailed in the van of the escort vessels. Among these…(was)…HMCS Bittersweet with A.B. Hank Carruthers.”
86 - Carruthers, Jack - PO RCNVR
- Vol.18/1942/No.2-Feb. p.9 – “The Navy called another two well-known brothers-Hank and Jack Carruthers, both at sea somewhere off the Pacific coast.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.5-May. p.9 – “Last month Jack Carruthers…was home on leave after convoy duty in the Atlantic. In an Eastern Canadian port, Jack met Pilot Officer Willie Gilmour and Lieut.-Col. Arthur Sutton…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “In the ranks of the bluejackets are scores of former employees, well known throughout the district. There is…Jack and Hank Carruthers…worthy of the tradition handed down and maintained by the Royal Navy.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.10-Oct. p.9 – “An interesting feature of this month’s review is the reunion overseas of Jack Carruthers and his sister Margaret. Jack reached England in the course of his convoy duties, and spent a week with Margaret, who left Powell River five years ago. Jack has been on Atlantic convoy for the past 18 months.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.1-Jan. p.9 – “And when we grow a bit too introspective on this fuel shortage or freezing weather give a thought to…Jack Carruthers… and scores of others who keep the U-boats from our shores and protect our men in their journeys across the high seas in all kinds of weather.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.1-Jan. p.10 – “To date, word has been received from…Jack Carruthers…and others, telling of the warm sunshine and the blue waters of the “Med”.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.2-Feb. p.6 – “Leading Aircraftsman Bert Grundle…stepped off a transport somewhere in North Africa…he was wishing, “Gee, if some of the old gang were around, we could do this place right.” Anyway, Bert stepped ashore-and ran straight, or nearly straight, into the arms of Cpl. Bruce Patterson…They almost turned in the hat trick –but not quite. First-class Stoker Jack Carruthers had been around earlier in the day-but his ship had just left port.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.5-May. p.14 – “With the first group of corvettes exacting one of the greatest sea convoys in history were several Powell River boys, Stoker PO Scotty Abbott, Leading Seaman Jack Carruthers, Stoker 1/C Eddie Riley and several others.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.6-Jun. p.15 – “Jack Carruthers’ boat was in Bone just after the first landing. Missed him by a hair, but hope to catch up with him next time.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.11-Nov. p.10 – “And in the Mediterranean, local lads like Jackie Carruthers, Scotty Abbott, Eddie Riley and many others have fought their Oerlikons and light guns in the face of blazing Stuka attacks.”
- Jun/44, p.2 – “And again the Navy with Petty Officer officially confirmed for…Jack Carruthers.”
- Jun/44, p.4 – (in a letter from R.V. Leese) “Ran into Jack Carruthers…about a year ago, and hear from some of the boys now and the. But they never seem to get out to this part of the country (South Wales).”
- Sep/44, p.3 – “PO Jack Carruthers was also home for three weeks. Looks fine and says Hello.”
- Jul/46, p.6 – (re: African Landings) “On the Lunenburg, Jack Carruthers, behind an anti-aircraft gun, helped beat off a succession of Stuka attacks; and twice torpedoes missed his ship by a few yards.”
87 - Carter, W.D. (Don) - Corporal Canadian Army Overseas
- Jul/43, p.1 – “Don Carter with the R.A.M.C. is a pukkah Sergeant [sic?].”
- May/44, p.3 – “Cpl. Don Carter, R.C.A.M.C. is at 20
th. Can. Gen. Hospital in Windsor.”
- Aug/44, p.3 – (K-80523) #1 CAMC, RCAMC, CAO. “Thanks for the News Letters and parcels which are arriving regularly. Have only been here about four months and the first P.R. fellow I saw was Price Amos. Strangely enough, we both sat down at the same dinner table…Saw Capt. Bat MacIntyre a few weeks ago. He is the same old Bat. Norm Hill, Johnny Alexander and Bill Crockett are very close to our camp. PS. Can’t seem to get away from night shifts. Am on duty 18:30 – 07:30 for balance of month.”
88 - Casey, Bud
- Sep/44, p.5 – (in a letter from E.J.C. Dore) “Had quite a surprise last week when Bud Casey dropped in here. Bud has sure settled down and is a first class soldier.”
89 - Casey, Ranie - PO RCNVR
- Jan/44, p.3 – “P.O. Ranie Casey can be found at Box 1123, F.M.O., Halifax.”
- Mar/44, p.2 – “Ranie Casey is still attached to the RCN. Drop him a note care of GPO London.(P.O. Casey, Ranie, V-30570 RCNVR).”
- Jun/44, p.2 – (re: Normandy invasion) “Quite a number of the lads…(including) Raney [sic] Casey were probably kicking around somewhere in the vicinity.”
90 - Cattermole, M.R. (Monty) - LAC RCAF
- Aug/44, p.5 – “Just heard that LAC M.R. Cattermole was married on August 14 to Miss Phyllis Treleaven of Souris, at Brandon, Man. (Our very best wishes to you both!)”
- Jun/45, p.1 - “About 15 have been discharged in the past month…(including) Monty Cattermole (just married).”
91 - Cattermole, N. (Norm) – Leading Seaman RCNVR
- Oct/44, p.2 - “Norm Cattermole (Ldg. Smn. N. Cattermole, V-36201, RCNVR, HMCS Trillium, FMO Halifax, NS) is up to Leading Seaman…”
- Oct/44, p.2 – “Norm Cattermole gave the natives of Cranberry a real flutter, when he popped up with a brand new Mrs. Cattermole, the former Miss F. Cooke.”
- Jan/45, p.5 – (in a letter from Stanley Richardson) “Norm Cattermole is around these parts (West Indies) but so far I’ve not had the luck to run into him.”
92 - Challis, Jack - Sapper Canadian Army Overseas
- Vol.18/1942/No.4-Apr. p.10 – “And the Royal Canadian Engineers are doing quite well. Jack Challis and Bob Lye report running into Joe Graham-and the boys staged another of those famous Powell River reunions that are coming to constitute a “major operation” in the Canadian Army overseas.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.2-Feb. p.8 – (following several mock pictures of Jack as a cook)…“There is one bright ray in all this. Jack is not a permanent cook. His chief duties are still running motorcycles all over England and repairing tanks and othes AFV’s that come his way. But they are ropng him in gradually to cook for the section…PS…Mrs. Challis will be able to sleep in at breakfast when Corporal, Temporary Cook Challis returns to the old stamping ground.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.3-Mar. p.5 – “Recently, …Jack Challis paid a visit to Nottingham, famed as a favorite Canadian port of call (seven girls to every male in the district).”
- Jan/44, p.2 – “Jack Challis is driving “cats” somewhere in this (Mediterranean) area.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.12/13 – “The Divisional troops, Artillery, Service Corps, Tank Brigade, etc., have Cpl. Jack Challis…”
- Feb/44, p.3 – (in a letter from C.O. Robson) “…Cpl. Jack Challis (is) still with us…(on the Sangro River, Italy)”
- Mar/44, p.2 – “Bryan Denton is still in the Mediterranean and tells us he keeps in close contact with…Jack Challis…”
- Mar/44, p.5 – (in a letter from J.B. Denton) “I’m still in close contact with…Jack Challis…”
- Jun/44, p.2 – “Received word that Jack Challis was injured in Italy and is now in hospital.”
- Jul/46, p10 - (re: Sicily and Italy) “All specialist branches were liberally sprinkled with lads from the paper town…(including)…Cpl. Jack Challis…Engineers”
93 - Chalmers, T.D. (Tommy) - Gunner RCA
- Oct/44, p.4 – (in a letter from Slim McVicker) “…See Tommy Chalmers (in Shaughnessy Hospital) occasionally…”
94 - Chiarcossi, G. (Blackie) - Corporal RCASC
- Dec/44, p.2 – “Blackie Chiarcossi (is) now (a) confirmed corporal.”
95 - Christiansen, A.J. - Private Canadian Army Overseas
- Vol.18/1942/No.11-Nov. p.9 – “Up in Alaska group of Powell River boys had a get-together at the hjome of Don Gahan, former company employee. These included Gunner A. Christiansen”
- Feb/45, p.1 – “The following have arrived overseas (including)…Pte. A.J. Christiansen, K-603194.”
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96 - Christiansen, Lloyd - AB RCN
(PH002108)
- Jul/46, p.7 – (re: D-Day) “Patrolling in the area too was Canada’s anti-aircraft cruiser, HMCS Robert, with Lloyd Christiansen…on the alert for enemy sky raiders.”
97 – Christie, R.J. (Bob) – Private Canadian Army Overseas
- Vol.18/1942/No.7-Jul. p.12 – “Several Powell River boys have landed safely overseas (including) Private Bob Christie…”