Service Men - Clark - Curly

98 - Clark, N.E. (Neil) - AB RCNVR
- May/43, p.5 – “Recent enlistments in the old home town include…Neil Clark, RCN.”
- Mar/44, p.4 – (V-55179), HMCS Wallaceburg, FMO, Halifax, NS “Thanks a million for the cigarettes and the Monthly News Letter. Thanks a lot for Jackie Mullen and Ken Marshall’s address. I have been wanting to write to them for a long while. Next time I get to Newfoundland I’ll look up Reg Parkin. Still cold around Newfy. The icebergs are beginning to float around and our ship looked like a floating iceberg itself.”
99 - Clarke, Don – Flying Officer RCAF India Command
- Vol.18/1942/No.3-Mar. p.3 – (photo caption) – “Three Powell River boys in training at an eastern Air Force camp…(including)…Don Clark pose for a special shot.”
- Apr/43, p.1 – “Don Clarke (is) a Pilot Officer.”
- May/43, p.5 - “We thank the scores of boys who have written us and are only sorry we can’t include all your letters. We hope to get around to most of them some time. Meantime we would like to acknowledge letters from…Don Clarke…”
- Mar/44, p.2 – “…Don Clark [sic] has skipped up the ladder to Flying Officer.”
- Mar/44, p.2 – “Flying Officer Don Clark [sic] is more or less marking time awaiting pending developments – he is in Boundary Bay for the moment.”
- Apr/44, p.2 – “Flying Officer Don Clark [sic] rushed up for the day and asks us to tell Martin Naylor and Frank Mannion to hold everything.”
- Jul/44, p.3 – “Don Clark [sic]…(is) Overseas – and we hear Don and Martin caught up with each other quick. “Boy, does that guy Naylor know London” Don writes ecstatically.”
- Aug/44, p.2 – “just received word that Don Clarke is headed for the bazaars of Calcutta and the flesh pots of Bombay (J-23732) (Can.) RCAF, RAF India Command. Don spent about a month in England and has just been transferred to the East. Quite a number of the lads are heading out that way.”
- Jan/45, p.4 - #435 RCAF Squadron, India Command “Thanks for the 900 smokes received through the B.C. Tobacco League. Have heard you old crocks talk about the Limey cigarettes and I’ve howled about those of this war, but never have I smoked such awful gaspers as they have out here. Ivan Hansen and Bob Gornall are in this squadron. See a lot of Ivan…our work is very interesting. I expect to go to Calcutta for a few days leave shortly.”
-Vol.21/1945/No.1-Jan. p.10/11 – “Last week from somewhere in India, a letter arrived from Cpl. “Dint” Hunter…Said Dint: “It was just like Old Home Week when I arrived out here. Hardly arrived at the station before I ran into Ivan Hansen, Don Clarke, Bob Gornall and Johnny MacIntosh.”
- Feb/45, p.3 – (in a letter from I.E. Hansen) “I see Don Clarke practically ever day, being in the same squadron.”
- Mar/45, p.2 – “And here are a few messages we promised to send. Martin Naylor, Bruce Paterson and Harry Cooper send regards to “Watsy McKnight, Geno Bortolussi and Don Clarke.”
- Apr/45, p.3 – (in a letter from Alan Todd) “Hear from Don Clarke…regularly and may get down (his) way one of these days.”
- Vol.21/1945/No.4/5-Apr./May p.11– “Out in India working with the swiftly advancing forces of Admiral Mountbatten is the 435
th Squadron, RCAF. In the squadron six Powell River lads are carrying on the fight against the Jap. These are Flying Officers Don Clarke and Jock MacIntosh, Corporals Bob Gornall and Dint Hunter, LAC Ivan Hansen and Ron Smythe. All of these lads were posted seperately to the RAF India Command, and were unaware of each other’s whereabouts. Don Clarke was posted to the 435th Squadron. A few days later Jock MacIntosh turned up to make it a Powell River two-some. Then came along Dint Hunter, wondering what he would find in India. He found Don and Jock, who had been joined by Ivan Nansen, Bob Gornall and Ron Smythe. “It was just like Old Home Week,” reminisced Dint in a recent letter.”It was sure great to see so many of the old gang together, and, believe me, we made the most of it.”
100 - Clayton, H.F. (Frank) - LAC RCAF
- Apr/43, p.5 – “Recent enlistments around town include…Frank Clayton…”
101 - Clough, W. (Bill) - Sergeant Navigator RCAF
- Jan/45, p.1 – Bill Clough is also Sgt. Navigator, picking up his wing this month; uncertain of future movements.”
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102 - Clutterbuck, W. (Bill) - Private VGC
(PH002285)
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.8 – “Twenty-two Powell River representatives are numbered in the ranks of the First Canadian Battalion, Canadian Scottish, Third Division. They include such stalwarts as Pte. Bill Clutterbuck…”
- May/43, p.4 – (K-57566) B Coy. 1
st CSR CAO “Sure like the News Letter and keep it coming. The Powell River boys in the Scottish are all o.k. Hugh Cairney will be away for a while. He has a bit of stomach trouble and is now with the Holding Unit. We have travelled around quite a lot and recently went down to see the old ship Victory. Had beautiful weather in March. Worked a few days on a farm lat week thrashing oats and wheat.”
- Aug/43, p.1 – “And Bill Clutterbuck and Jack Harper have returned from Overseas. Bill and Denny Green had a couple of beers together or maybe it was four or five. Bill gives local beer a “C” rating.”
- Feb/44, p.5 – “
Special to 1st Battalion, Canadian Scottish Bill Clutterbuck was just in to say “so long”. Bill found civilian life a shade on the tame side and has joined up again in the Veterans’ Guard. He asks us to let all his old pals overseas, particularly the Scottish, know this – and apologizes for not writing – but you know Bill. Promises to write as soon as he gets settled. Will be with Joe Miller so you can picture what’s cooking when these two middle aged hellions go into action.”
- Mar/44, p.3 – “Bill Clutterbuck is with the 31
st Company, Veterans’ Guard at Medicine Hat. Bill tried civilian life for a brief interval, but couldn’t resist the old appeal.”
- Jun/44, p.2 – “And Bill Clutterbuck sends greetings to all his old pals in the Scottish, and would like a line when you have time to spare. Bill is still at Lethbridge with the 26
th Company, Veterans’ Guard.”
- Jun/45, p.2 – “Bill Clutterbuck…and the bunch with the Veterans’ Guard are still doing duty at POW camps. Figure that they will be several months on the job before the Huns go back home again.”
103 - Cofield, Russell (Russ) - LAC #5 OTU
- Apr/43, p.4 - “We wish to acknowledge and thank…AC Russ Cofield...for (his) nice letter.”
104 - Connelly, J.C. (Scotty) - Private Canadian Army Overseas
- Vol.17/1941/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “…News has come through of the safe arrival in England of Canada’s Third Division…includ(ing) the 1st Battalion Canadian Scottish, whose nominal roll includes twenty-two Powell River boys. Among these (is)…Joe Connelly.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.8 – “Twenty-two Powell River representatives are numbered in the ranks of the First Canadian Battalion, Canadian Scottish, Third Division. They include such stalwarts as Pte. “Scotty” Connelly…”
- Vol.19/1943/No.5-May. p.10 – “In the last mail, we discovered that Norm Hill, Scotty Connelly and Bill Crockett are now corporals.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.12/13 – “The Divisional troops, Artillery, Service Corps, Tank Brigade, etc., have Cpl. “Scotty” Connelly…”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.13 – “Our Central Mediterranean casualties to date include the following:
Hospital (Sickness or Accident)-Cpl. Scotty Connelly.”
- May/44, p.1 – “And to Corp. Scotty Connelly, (thanks) for “Red Patch”, “Eighth Army News” and “Union Jack”.”
- May/44, p.2 – “Corp. Scotty Connelly, who was wounded at Ortona, is still at a base camp. It is possible Scotty may be invalided out.”
- May/44, p.3 – (K-73063) 38
th Base Ret. Coy. #1 CBRG, CA, CMF “Just received three copies of the News Letters, also a thousand cigarettes – and please thank the Powell River Company very much. Certainly after those barn sweepings they called V’s, these cigarettes were like a breath of Powell River ozone…In every issue you complain about the liquor ration. I wish I could charter a boat or maybe you could send Jim Cowley over with his and I’ll load you down with vermouth, brandy, rum, cognac and numerous other drinks whose names I can’t spell…My best regards to Buzz Blondin and tell him to lay off that getting old stuff. Tell him we have picked up a few new songs.”
- Sep/44, p.3 – “Scotty Connelly tells us it’s pretty squishy (muddy) around Rimini…”
-Sep/44, p.3 – “A special kudo to Scotty Connelly for those choice pamphlets.”
- Sep/44, p.5 – 1
st Can. Armored Bde., (83 Coy) CA CMF “Please thank the Company for the cigs which arrived in good order and were much appreciated…This will also advise you of my change of address. Am now with the Tanks and we have seen plenty of action with a capital A. Took a day off to go back and see Florence, and it was certainly worth the trip…Also find enclosed propaganda leaflets.”
- Jul/46, p10 (147) - (re: Sicily and Italy) “All specialist branches were liberally sprinkled with lads from the paper town…(including)…J “Scotty” Connelly, Armored Brigade…”
105 - Coomber, Harvey, Jr. - Signalamn CAO
- May/43, p.1 – “Sig. Harvey Coomber, now overseas, has advanced a very practical idea – namely that we incorporate, along with names, the regimental number and address. This is being carried out in the current issue and thanks a lot to Harvey.”
- Jul/44, p.2 – “Harvey Coomber…is engaged, but only till October, when wedding bells will ring out ye old chimes.”
- Oct/44, p.2 – “Harvey Coomber, Jr. early in October, took himself and his bride, Miss Joyce Holley of Ewell, Surrey, to the village church, gulped out an “I do” – and joined the rapidly expanding membership in PRSFPEW (Powell River Society For Perpetuation of English Women).”
106 - Coomber, R.B. (Ralph) - Leading Seaman HMCS La Mal Bai FMO Halifax
- Nov/44, p.1 – “Ralph Coomber (V-36331) who has been doing a job of trans-Atlantin commuting, is up to Leading Seaman.”
107 - Cooper, Gordon – Flight Lieutenant RCAF Overseas
- May/44, p.2 – “Gordon Cooper, brother of Russ Cooper, our general superintendent, is also “in camp” (POW) with Tommy (Gardiner) and Wilf (Kipp).”
- Apr/45, p.1 – “Everybody anxious to hear about our prisoners of war. We have Tommy Gardiner, Bob Gairns, Joe Davenport, Gordon Cooper in various camps.”
- May/45, p.1 – “Good news about our prisoners of war. The whole shebang have turned up and are in England, in Canada or on their way. Flight Lieutenant Gord Cooper is back in Canada after three years in Germany. Was released by the Second Army.”
108 - Cooper, Harry – Pilot Officer RAF Middle East Forces
- Vol.17/1941/No.8-Aug. p.6 – “From Calgary comes word that Harry Cooper, former business machine operator, has successfully passed his wireless and gunnery course. Harry is the first Powell River boy to graduate from the RCAF wireless school.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.10-Oct. p.15 – “Other local boys who have gone overseas in recent weeks include Sergeant Harry Cooper…”
- Vol.17/1941/No.11-Nov. p.6 – “Within the past month, those inseperable pals of the business machine staff, Bruce Patterson [sic] and Harry Cooper, blond Frank Foyston of Kelly Spruce, and Howie Sutton of the machine room, have reported “all present and correct” from the Old Land.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.5-May. p.8 – “Tommy Gardiner, our lacrosse and basketball star, spent a glorious ten days’ leave in London and way points with an officer of the Australian forces. Several weeks later Tommy turns up in Cairo, along with Sergt.-Obs. Harry Cooper and Sergt. Robin Leese. Both boys visited Cape Town
en route, and they have already travelled more than half the distance around the globe.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.7-Jul. p.12 – “Somewhere in the same neighborhood (near, far or middle east) is Sergeant Observer Harry Cooper…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.9 – “Over the baked sands of Libya (is) Sergt. Observer Harry Cooper…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.12-Dec. p.4 – “Our thoughts go out to Sergt. Pilot Harry Cooper…and others who are in the Medditerranean and North Africa and who may have little leisure in which to enjoy the Christmas trimmings we are taking as a matter of course.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.1-Jan. p.10-11 – “Harry Cooper, in his latest letter, described the exaltation among the bomber crews as they chased Rommel across the roof of Africa. After the long retreat and the stalemate at Alamein, the boys have the scent of victory in their nostrils, and find it good. Harry has completed upwards of 60 operational flights.”
- Vol. 20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.13 - “Among Air Force personnel serving in the (Mediterranean) (is) WO Harry Cooper…”
- Apr/44, p.1 – “We take a real pleasure in announcing that Harry Cooper, after swing-shifting all over the African desert and the Middle East Between the SAAF and RAF, has been upped to Pilot Officer.”
- Dec/44, p.2 – “Expecting quite a few more of the boys home soon. Flying [sic] Officer Harry Cooper is on his way, and will probably be discharged or retained in Canada.”
- Jan/45, p.2 – “Flying Officers Harry Cooper and Martin Naylor arrived in Powell River together around the middle of January. Both are expecting discharges within the next few weeks, and will return to Powell River. Both look fine and can still do some traveling when occasion warrants – as it did.”
- Jan/45, p.3 – “Heard something recently about the odd leave in Cairo and asked Henry Cooper for details. We got ‘em!”
- Feb/45, p.2 – “We expect Harry Cooper…back in the plant any day…(he is) awaiting discharge.”
- Vol.21/1945/No.2-Feb. p.10– “In January, three more…returned (including)…Flying Officer Harry Cooper, veteran of over sixty operational flihjts in the desert.”
- Mar/45, p.1 – “Harry Cooper (is) now officially discharged.”
- Mar/45, p.2 - “And here are a few messages we promised to send. Martin Naylor, Bruce Paterson and Harry Cooper send regards to “Watsy McKnight, Geno Bortolussi and Don Clarke.”
- May/45, p.6 – “Harry Cooper (is) back in the office and settling down to the old grind.”
- Jun/45, p.5 – “A pretty fair summer all round. Willingdon Beach well crowded in June and July. Nice a lot of the “old” soldiers like Harry Cooper…hanging around the old swimming hole regularly.”
- Jul/46, p15 – “Out in Africa, on the Milk Run to Tobruck, following the fortunes of the Eighth Army for nearly three years was Pilot Officer Harry Cooper.”
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109 - Cormier, R. (Ray) - Private (K-67499) RHLI (2nd Can. Division) CAO
(PH002276)
- Vol.18/1942/No.7-Jul. p.12 – “Several Powell River boys have landed safely overseas (including) Private Ray Cormier…”
- Aug/43, p.3 – “Just received the Powell River Company’s cigarettes and sure appreciate them. I just can’t go for those Limey smokes. How are the girls making out in the mill. I’d sure hate to marry a grinder room girl after the war; guess she’d be the boss.”
- May/44, p.3 – “Ray Cormier is still with the Royal Hamiltons, so if you’re around that way, say hello.”
- Jul/44, p.3 – Ray Cormier (#3 CIRU CAE) is still in England and transferred to the Holding Unit of the RHLI’s.”
- Jul/44, p.4 – “…Sure glad to get the News Letter. Well, I’m in the holding unit waiting for a reboard and think I’ll be getting my category lowered. Sure want to get out of this Old Man’s Home. Volunteered for three drafts for Italy but they keep taking me off…I’ll bet any of the fellows who came into town now have to beat the girls off with a stick. I’ve got me a nice little Highland lassie. I like the way she says, “I dinna ken what you’re talking aboot, lad”.”
- Dec/44, p.3 – “Ray Cormier (#4 Can. Convalescent Depot, Essex Scottish Regiment, CA England) was wounded in the right leg at Falaise on August 22, and is doing nicely.”
-Vol.21/1945/No.1-Jan. p.11 – “And from Ray Cormier, convalescing from wounds received in the Falaise Gap: “I saw Dick Jacob in hospital. Hasn’t changed a bit, and we spent the time talking about Powell River. And the other day in London I met Rod Matheson and Dick Stevens-and that called for a celebration.”
110 - Cormier, Stan - OS RCNVR
- Jun/45, p.2 – “Another eastbound youngster is Stan Cormier who server on the Algonquin and who is home on a two months’ leave.”
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111 - Cottingham, Ron - Canadian Army Overseas
(PH002350)
112 - Courte, J.E. (Jimmy) - Private Little Mountain Barracks
- Apr/45, p.2 – “Last enlistments in the Army include Jimmy Courte…Almost makes you think the War Babies Battalion is being called up.”
113 – Couvelier, Chuck
-Vol.16/1940/No.8-Aug. p.5/16 – “We had quite a reunion here. Five Powell River boys all got together-Jack Carr, Charlie MacIntosh, Chuck Couvelier, Sandy Strachan and myself (Ernest Campbell). About all we could do was have our pictures taken.”
- Vol.16/1940/No.11-Nov. p.14 – “At St. Thomas, Ontario, concentration point for ground crew mechanics, repairmen, etc.,are Jack Redhead and “Chuck” Couvelier…”
114 - Cowley, J.A. (Jim) - LAC RCAF
- May/44, p.3 - (in a letter from J.C. Connelly) “In every issue you complain about the liquor ration. I wish I could charter a boat or maybe you could send Jim Cowley over with his and I’ll load you down with vermouth, brandy, rum, cognac and numerous other drinks whose names I can’t spell…”
115 - Craig, R.R. (Bob) - LAC RCAF Overseas 253 Hyderabad State Sqad. BNAF
- Vol.19/1943/No.5-May. p.14/15 – “Ashore (in Algeria) with the first of the ground crew were Cpl. Bruce Patterson (sic) and LAC Bob Craig.”
- Jul/43, p.3 – “Thanks very much for the News Letter; it was very welcome indeed. Out here any news from home is doubly welcome. This is quite a country out here. At certain times of the year it is not bad at all, when they get the sunny Africa, I don’t know. I saw more rain last Winter than I ever saw in Powell River but now it is getting real warm, much like mid-summer at home. There is very little on the recreative line. Until just lately there were only two Canadians on the squadron but there are six of us now, They brought along a softball and a bat so we have the odd game of scrub. They also have a Canadian football so we toss that around once in a while. There is also the odd game of soccer and cricket for those who play it. We are also able to get down to the Med once in a while and have a swim; it’s really all right too; it’s just the right temperature but a bit on the salty side.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.13 – “Among Air Force personnel serving in the (Mediterranean) (is) LAC Bob Craig…”
- Mar/44, p.5 – (in a letter from J.B. Denton) “Bob Craig is within fifty miles of here but we haven’t got together yet. We may meet in a wine cellar one of these days.”
- Apr/44, p.4 – (R-143223) #286 Wing, CMF “Thanks a million for the News Letter. I get them pretty regularly. The old Powell River family is sure spread around the world. Sure miss the old lacrosse and basketball games. Not much sport here outside of football and cricket. Guess I will have to play cricket as I am gradually becoming Anglicized every other way. Good show, what-oh, cherrio, etc. are creeping slowly but surely into my vocabulary.”
- Sep/44, p.4 – “Received another 600 Cigarettes from the Company today, and they are always welcome in these parts…Have been over to Algiers to take a course, but I managed a few other things besides. Met Bert Grundle over there, and we had a real reunion…Say hello to all the gang for me.”
- Jun/45, p.2 – “LAC Bob Craig is in much the same boat and should be following his pals…homeward.”
116 - Cramb, Henry (Hank) - Sergeant RCAF
- May/43, p.3 – “Hank Cramb dropped in for a visit recently. He was taking a disciplinarious course at Trenton.”
- May/43, p.5 – (in a letter from P. Dawson) “Saw Hank Cramb at Trenton recently.”
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117 – Crilly, Mike - Canadian Army Overseas
(PH002352)

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118 - Crockett, George – Private CAO
(PH002338) [Crockett, George (left); Bill (right) (?)]
- Vol.16/1940/No.9-Sep. p.6 – “Jock Campbell…is with the Canadian Scottish in Victoria, along with a large crowd of Powell River boys, including Jimmy Jacobs, Rusty Taylor, Joe Hugh Carney, Joe Tash, Hock Pelley, George and Bill Crockett, Colin McLauchlan and many others.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.1-Jan. p.9 – “Over the New Year period, scores of the boys were home on furlough-and spent the holiday season with parents, relatives or friends. Several boys, including Joe Graham and George Crockett, made the long trip from Truro, Nova Scotia, to the West Coast, They report snow, and sub-zero temperatures-and wish they could take our BC weather back east with them.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “…News has come through of the safe arrival in England of Canada’s Third Division…includ(ing) the 1
st Battalion Canadian Scottish, whose nominal roll includes twenty-two Powell River boys. Among these (is) George Crockett…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.8 – “Twenty-two Powell River representatives are numbered in the ranks of the First Canadian Battalion, Canadian Scottish, Third Division. They include such stalwarts as Pte. George Crockett…”
- Oct/44, p.4 – (in a letter from Bill Crockett) “…Brother George is doing all right.”
- Jul/46, p11 – (re: D-Day) “Hitting the beaches in that first unstoppable assault with the Scottish (was) George Crockett…”
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119 - Crockett, J.W. (Bill) - Corporal CAO
(PH002338) [Crockett, George (left); Bill (right) (?)]

- Vol.16/1940/No.9-Sep. p.6 – “Jock Campbell…is with the Canadian Scottish in Victoria, along with a large crowd of Powell River boys, including Jimmy Jacobs, Rusty Taylor, Joe Hugh Carney, Joe Tash, Hock Pelley, George and Bill Crockett, Colin McLauchlan and many others.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “…News has come through of the safe arrival in England of Canada’s Third Division…includ(ing) the 1st Battalion Canadian Scottish, whose nominal roll includes twenty-two Powell River boys. Among these (is) Bill Crockett…”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.8 – “Twenty-two Powell River representatives are numbered in the ranks of the First Canadian Battalion, Canadian Scottish, Third Division. They include such stalwarts as Pte. Bill Crockett…”
- Vol.19/1943/No.5-May. p.10 – “In the last mail, we discovered that Norm Hill, Scotty Connelly and Bill Crockett are now corporals.”
- Jul/44, p.2 – “Here are some of the Army lads thus far identified in Normandy…(including)…Bill Crockett…”
- Jul/44, p.4 – D Coy. 1
st BN. Can. Scottish Regt. CAO BWEF “The News Letter was among the first mail received since landing in France and it was sure good reading, A bit tired but still holding out after some pretty steady work. Dick Jacob and I had a good snort of decent French wine last night. Dick also supplied me with my late supper, coming on the shape of a nice big steak. Wish Pilsener had a factory over here.”
- Aug/44, p.3 – (in a letter from W.D. Carter) “…and Bill Crockett (is) very close to our camp.”
- Oct/44, p.4 – (K-57545) 1
st BN, CSR CAO % Leavesden Military Hospital “Just received an August News Letter and it was swell after missing them for several months…Jerry kind of put me out of the fighting. I have a compound fracture of the right leg and a rather badly cut thigh. But he got the worst of the deal, I can assure you…Brother George is doing all right. Have seen Fred Harding and Bill Price. Both look fine. Phil Jacobs is still in there pitching. Cigarettes are arriving fine, and I do a lot of smoking these days, being still in bed. Tell Jimmy Jacobs to drop me a line. “
- Dec/44, p.3 – “Cpl. Bill Crockett is back in Canada, but we haven’t seen him yet.”
- Jan/45, p.3 – (in a letter from R.A. Jacob) “…My best to Bill Crockett…”
- Jul/46, p11 – (re: D-Day) “Hitting the beaches in that first unstoppable assault with the Scottish (was)…Bill Crockett...”
Curly, ??
- Mar/44, p.3 – (in a letter from J. Gebbie) “Give my best to all the gang, Curly…etc. [Curly is back in the office, Jack, after discharge…]