Service Men - Macken - Messmer

401 - Macken, D.K. (Kenny) – Captain RCEME
- Mar/44, p.1 – “Kenny Macken and Batt MacIntyre have both passed into the three pipper group – so now its Captains MacIntyre and Macken.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.4-Apr. p.12 – “Both Batt MacIntyre and Ken Macken carry the three pips of a captain.”
- May/45, p.5 - “Lieutenant Jack Gebbie is at present in Ottawa learning all about Government Rehabilitation, Pension regulations, etc. Jack has been appointed Personnel Supervisor for the Company and will handle all questions of re-employment, transfers, and so forth, as well as giving you all possible assistance in the way of pensions. Ken Macken, recently discharged, is subbing for Jack until he returns from Ottawa.”
402 - X Magson, Phil – Pilot Officer RCAF Overseas
- Jul/46, p13 - “How well we remember these lads, because they were first in battle and were in our minds and hearts for so long…(including) Phil Magson…- all youngsters, who were part and parcel of our community and athletic life, were sucked up in the tempest.”
403 - Maguire, J.F. (Jack) - Flying Officer RCAF
SM-Maguire, J.F. (Jack) - Flying Officer RCAFSM-Maguire, J.F. (Jack) - Flying Officer RCAF-2
(PH002197) (PH002197-2)
- Vol.18/1942/No.7-Jul. p.13 – “…Jack Maguire, sulphite department,…received (his) wings as sergeant WAG…”
- Apr/43, p.1 – “Jack Maguire is a Flight Sergeant.”
- Jul/43, p.2 – “…and so is Fl. Sgt. Jack Maguire (with the RAF in the Bahamas).”
- Jul/43, p.4 – (R-118181) Sergeants’ Mess RAF Station Nassau Bahamas “It was really quite a surprise to me in Halifax when I was posted to the Bahamas. Was practically certain of going to Europe but two of us were picked out of my flight to come down here. The trip down was quite interesting. Had a glimpse of New York and spent two days in Miami. Miami is really lovely with magnificent beaches although extremely hot right now. Nassau is really a beautiful spot too. It’s quite hot, of course, but not as bad as Florida. The beaches are fine too and swimming is our main diversion. The station here is not too bad at all. Our quarters and food are quite good.”
- Jan/44, p.2 – “WO Jack Maguire, RAF India Command, is probably checking up on the accuracy of “Mother India”.”
- Feb/44, p.2 – “WO Jack Maguire is in Ceylon, RCAF Sec. “Y” c/o RAF Ceylon.”
- Apr/44, p.4 – (in a letter from H.G. Parker) “Hear Jack Maguire is out here and will look for him.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.4-Apr. p.12 – “W.O. Jack Maquire is in Ceylon.”
- May/44, p.2 - “…Jack Maguire (WO Maguire, J. R-118181 (Can.) RCAF, Sec. “Y” c/o RAF India) is doing all right and hopes to run across Hap Parker and Billy Heyes.”
- May/44, p.5 – “The News Letters have finally caught up with me. Received the February issue, and also two dated April and May 1943, which followed me from the Bahamas…On the way out spent a few interesting days gawking at the Pyramids, the native bazaars and the really beautiful mosques. Before leaving Blighty, had a few days in London and was taken in tow by that accomplished city slicker, Frank O’Neil. Saw quite a bit of India and was impressed with Delhi. The Government Buildings, the Vice Regal Palace and War Memorial form one of the most beautiful sights I have ever seen. Ceylon, while not as magnificent, is more picturesque. A hilly country, and jungle clad hills rise on all sides, in some cases as high as 8000 ft. Our station is right in the heart of the jungle. Have been to Kandy and Colombo, and the heat in the latter place is terrific. Vegetation is luxuriant and there are thousands of colorful birds, lots of monkeys, a few wild boar, a few snakes and the odd elephant or two…Cheerio and the best to all at home. You have to leave BC and the Pacific Coast to realize what a fine place it is.”
- Aug/44, p.2 – “Jack Maguire is now back in England, after nearly eighteen months in India and Ceylon.”
- Sep/44, p.2 – “…congratulations to Pilot Officer Jack Maguire on his promotion. Jack picked his rank up the hard way. Travelled pretty well around the world chasing it, and went through all the steps from Sergeant to WO1.”
- Oct/44, p.4 – (J-88469) RCAF Overseas “…It was a treat to get back to Blighty again this summer. England’s countryside looked wonderfully lush after the deserts and jungles of India. Ceylon was not too bad. Hot, but plenty of rain to keep us cool. India was a different matter. Where we were was flat desert without a tree or spot fo shade for miles, and from April until the monsoons started in mid-July, temperatures varied from 100 to 120 in the shade.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.12-Dec. p.10-12 – “Thirty-five thousand miles. One and one-half times around the circumference of the earth. That is the distance Pilot Officer Jack Maguire travelled to and from war. On July 12, 1941, Jack enlisted in the RCAF. In April of 1943 he completed his course, was booked for overseas, but found himself transferred overnight to a Royal Air Force Station in the Bahamas, British West Indies. In the Bahamas Jack found much to admire, much to criticize and much to take or leave. His patrols carried him far off to sea and to other islands in this same tropical area. He assisted on submarine look-outs and patrolled vital sea lanes of the area. In between times he learned about siestas, met the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, visited and sampled the English customs and background around which much of the island life revolves, the clubs, the whiskeys and sodas, the native servants. All told for war time, a good spot. On October 19, 1943, Jack, then a sergeant-pilot, was transferred to the RAF Transport Command in Eastern Canada. A few days later he arrived in England via bomber. He just had time to look over a couple of English hedges and visit maybe one pub in the Strand when he was called to the East. Around about Christmas he turned up in Ceylon. In Ceylon, Jack and his Liberator were on constant duty. His ship participated in one of the longest single flights of the war, a 2700-mile trip over the Bay of Bengal, and on to Sumatra. Visited Kandy, the ancient capital, and was inspected by Lord Mountbatten. Six months in Ceylon and then the RAF India command. Flying on secret missions and in secret places. Visited the bazaars of India, saw, on brief furloughs, the magnificent buildings of New Delhi. Was much impressed by the soundness and understanding of the Viceroy, Lord Wavell. Stopped at Calcutta, at Bombay, at Karachi and other famed spots along the Empire Air Route. Another four months in India and back to England via the mosques of Cairo and the canals of Alexandria. And thence back to England for a brief stay. And finally the welcome word that six months’ Canadian duty was on tap. So in November, 1944, over three years after his enlistment, Pilot-Officer Jack Maguire comes back to Canada.”
- Vol.21/1945/No.2-Feb. p.10– “Last December, Pilot Officer Jack Maguire came back to Canada, after lengthy service in the West Indies, India, Ceylon and the United Kingdom.”
- Jul/46, p15 – “Out in Ceylon and over the Indian Ocean was Pilot Officer Jack Maguire…”
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404 - Mannion, Frank – WO RCAF Overseas
(PH002195)
-
Vol.17/1941/No.1-Jan. p.9 – “Many other RCAF lads are also in the stretch…Frank Mannion and “Shadow” Brooks have passed through their preliminary training and expect to be in the air soon.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.5-May. p.8 – “Powell River was well represented in the latest contingent [to reach Britain]. Among the Air Force group (was) Pilot Officer Frank Mannion…”
- May/43, p.4 – (in a letter from Charlie Murray) “After arrival here I met…Frank Mannion (Ed. Note: Frankie seems to be the chief Powell River Greeter overseas…)”
- Vol.19/1943/No.5-May. p.10 – “Angus Bethune, Jackie Redhead, Ray Ingram and Frankie Mannion have been boosted to full sergeants.”
- Aug/43, p.2 – (in a letter from Garnet Gibson) “I was over here from January to April before I met any P.R. boys, but one night I met…Frank Mannion…”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.13 – (photo caption) “The wedding group at the recent marriage overseas of Sgt. Geno Bortolussi, famous local sprinter, and Miss Mary Baker, former local girl. Geno’s old schoolboy pal, Flt. Sgt. Frankie Mannion, acted as best man. Miss Baker, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid.”
- Jan/44, p.2 - “And Doug Campbell…had a real hilarious reunion with his old pals, Martin Naylor and Flt. Sgt. Frankie Mannion…”
- Vol.20/1944/No.3-Mar. p.13 – “As Frank Mannion says, “It was a relief to go out with a Canadian girl again. They don’t expect you to marry them after the first time.”
- Apr/44, p.2 - “Flying Officer Don Clark [sic] rushed up for the day and asks us to tell Martin Naylor and Frank Mannion to hold everything.”
- May/44, p.2 – “(Walter Elly’s marriage) leaves Frank Marrion [sic] as about the last of the old Wildwood gang to hang out against the propinquity of English maidenhood.”
- Oct/44, p.2 - “Out in India’s sunny clime, Bill Heyes is chasing along the trail after Frank and Johnny (Mannion and Willis).”
-Nov/44, p.3 - (in a letter from “Spud” Raimondo) “…Have run across Frankie Mannion…”
- Jun/45, p.3 – (in a letter from N.L. Harper) “…Frank Mannion is here with me and we have some great old chats. Hope to be seeing you soon.”
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405 - Maple, James – PO RCN
(PH002133)
- Vol.15/1939/No.9-Sept. p.5 – “The Canadian Navy claims Jimmy Maple…Jimmy was taken on the strength several months ago, and is at present on duty somewhere off the Pacific Coast.”
- Vol.16/1940/No.10-Oct. p.7 – Jimmy Maple, son of Ernie Maple of the barker mill, has seen plenty of active service with the Canadian navy. Jimmy has been on convoy, anti-submarine work, took part in the evacuation at Brest, and has had several thrilling experiences with the navy in European waters.”
- Vol.16/1940/No.12-Dec. p.16 – “Jimmy Maple is still somewhere at sea with the Royal Canadian navy, and he has had many fascinating experiences in the course of his regular duties.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.3-Mar. p.10 – “I am glad to be back in Canada to see the folks, but I want to go back to England when my leave is over. When you see what the people are facing over there and how they are facing it, you just want to get back and help them finish the job. All the fellows feel the same way.” This is how Jimmy Maple, who returned to Powell River on three weeks’ leave after a year in the war zones around the British Isles, sums up the sentiments of the boys in the Royal Canadian Navy. Jimmy is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Maple of Cranberry, and is the first Powell River boy to return from active service. He will report to his ship on the expiration of his leave…“We were at sea practically without rest for the past year save for quick run-ins for essential overhauls…And when you go in for overhaul in a British shipyard you get action, day or night. Those fellows know their business.” The Powell River boy took part in the evacuation of Brest, has been on anti-submarine patrol, on convoy duty-on all the manifold tasks which the overburdened destroyers are called to perform. His ship has helped swell the total of Hun submarine losses; she has been bombed and attacked by Hun planes, and “it’s all part of the day’s work,” Jimmy says modestly. Several entertainments were arranged for him during his leave, and all Powell River wishes Jimmy good luck and good sailing when he leaves the old home town to resume his duties in the Silent Service.
- Vol.18/1942/No.3-Mar. p.2 – “A recent article in
McLean’s Magazine told the thrilling story of HMCS Skeena’s three-day battle with wolf packs of Hun submarines…Aboard the Skeena in that great fight was Leading Seaman Jimmy Maple, of Powell River. Jimmy has been in numerous sea engagements. He was in the evacuation of Brest; his ship escorted the Illustrious to Gibraltar for her great battle in the Sicilian Straights; he has escorted hundreds of merchant ships and thousands of troops to the battle zones.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “Leading Seaman Jimmy Maple, on HMCS Skeena, has been in the thick of the fight since the first day of war. He was at Brest for the evacuation: his ship escorted the Illustious to Gibraltar; he was aboard the Skeena when that stout little ship beat off one of the heaviest wolf pack assaults of the war; he has been dive-bombed and shelled by the enemy.”
- Vol.19/1943/No.1-Jan. p.9 – “And when we grow a bit too introspective on this fuel shortage or freezing weather give a thought to…Jimmy Maple… and scores of others who keep the U-boats from our shores and protect our men in their journeys across the high seas in all kinds of weather.”
- Mar/44, p.2 – “The first name out of the hat this month is PO Jimmy Maple, RCN, in the service since 1938. Jimmy married Miss Elizabeth Brand, WRNS London on March 22
nd.”
- Apr/44, p.3 - (in a letter from H. Riley) “There are a few other Powell River boys here (London)…(including) Jimmy Maple…”
- Jun/44, p.2 - (re: Normandy invasion) “Quite a number of the lads (including)…Jimmy Maple…were probably kicking around somewhere in the vicinity
- Jun/44, p.3 – (3440) HMCS Niobe % GPO London England “Thanks again for the News Letter, which I assure you is most welcome to us all. I say “us”, meaning in particular, Johnny Elly, Ronny Furness, Danny Hopkins and myself, who, at present, are together at Niobe. It is surprising how may shipmates notice and comment on how you people at home look after us over here. They often say they wish their own particular town or city would do something similar…By the way, Harry Riley is here, but most of the boys don’t expect to be around much longer, due to expected events in the future…Thanks for mention of my marriage to a Scots lassie. Not so many months ago my ship shared in the destruction of a U-boat in the Bay of Biscay and took prisoners, who were plenty happy to be rescued. They are not so cocky as they used to be…We certainly realize the Company’s interest in the boys in the service, and be sure we all appreciate it.”
- Jul/46, p.4 - “At this moment (September 3, 1939), Powell River was already well represented in the military force of the Empire…On the high seas, at battle atations aboard HMCS Skeena was Jimmy Maple…”
- Jul/46, p.6 – “When the Restigouche was rammed in the Brest evacuation, June 1940, Jimmy Maple, on the old “Skeena” was there.”
406 - Marchant, Alex - Signalman
- Apr/45, p.2 – “Recent discharges include…Alex Marchant…Alec [sic] nay go back into the carbonated beverage business again.”
407 - Marcoux, W.F. (Bill) – Lance Corporal Canadian Army Overseas
- Jul/43, p.4 – (K-71784) “I’ve got your three editions of the Monthly News Leter and was mighty glad to get them. To read about those old fellows that were so familiar to me makes me very happy but kind of homesick. But I must say the cigarettes are the most welcome of all. I always look forward to their coming and feel really thankful for all the nice things sent to us.”
- Jun/45, p.4 – “N” Sec AII RCE HQ 2
nd Can Division Overseas “…Thanks a lot for the cigarettes and News Letters which have been coming regularly. Would you as a favor drop me Art Ross’s address. (Can’t do it for the moment, Bill. He is back in Canada but hasn’t arrived in P.R. Is going to Pacific. Suggest you write him c/o his mother, Mrs. Art Ross, here.)”
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408 - X Marlatt, S.P. (Hob) – Pilot Officer RCAF
(PH002193)
- Vol.17/1941/No.7-Jul. p.6/7 – “Four potential aces returned home for a brief visit last week, each wearing the wings of the RCAF on his tunic-and each a graduate of the Commonwealth Air Training Schools…(including)…”Hob” Marlatt…“Hob” Marlatt is the son of Dr. C.R. Marlatt, and received his preliminary education in Powell River. Prior to enlistment he was employed in the Vancouver Office of the Export Sales Company. Graduating as a Sergeant-Pilot, “Hob” was informed a week later that he had been awarded a commission as Pilot Officer.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.8-Aug. p.6 – “Pilot Officer Hob Marlatt, son of Dr. and Mrs. Marlatt, of Powell River, is also in England, and getting in some real practice with the latest British fighters.”
- Vol.17/1941/No.9-Sep. p.7 – “In the RCAF, “Shadow” Brooks and “Hob” Marlatt and Bill Daubner stand as the vanguard of a larger Powell River contingent that will soon join the RAF in their offensive against the Hun.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.10-Oct. p.8 – “…as is Hob Marlatt (a Flying Officer)…”
- Vol.19/1943/No.11-Nov. p.11 – (under “We Will Remember Them”)
“PO Marlatt, “Hob”
RCAF Dec ’42
England, Crashed in Fog.”
- Jul/46, p13 – “How well we remember these lads, because they were first in battle and were in our minds and hearts for so long…(including) Flying Officer Hob Marlatt (who) crashed in active service operations…- all youngsters, who were part and parcel of our community and athletic life, were sucked up in the tempest.”
409 - X Marshall, W.K. – Flying Officer RCAF Overseas
- Apr/43, p.1 – “W.K. Marshall is a Pilot Officer.”
- Jan/44, p.1 – “Ken Marshall drains out another drop of blood from the promotion towel to swing up to Flying Officer.”
- Mar/44, p.4 – (in a letter from N.E. Clark) “Thanks a lot for Ken Marshall’s address. I have been wanting to write to (him) for a long time.”
410 - Martin, Ian – WO RCN
- Vol.20/1944/No.3-Mar. p.13 – “…and Ian Martin, trapped (married) after some fancy dodging over the years.”
- Aug/44, p.5 – HMCS Vancouver FMO Halifax NS “…Right now am beginning to wonder whether this is a corvette or an ice breaker I’m on. Spent the winter in the southern warmth and am now spending the summer up with the ice bergs. Honestly, though, I’d gladly trade places with anybody back home…And now, how about a favor. I’d appreciate it if you’d put a depth charge under that Southcott and Campbell clan. I’d sure like to hear from them. Also Jack Parkin. Just threaten them a little. Tell them I’ll write their wives and tell all, if a letter isn’t forthcoming.”
411 - Martinuk, A. – Signalman Canadian Army Overseas
- May/43, p.5 - “We thank the scores of boys who have written us and are only sorry we can’t include all your letters. We hope to get around to most of them some time. Meantime we would like to acknowledge letters from…Spr. Martinuk…”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.12 – “The 9
th Armored Regiment recently arrived in the Mediterranean area…Some of those identified include…A. Martinuk.”
- Jul/46, p11 - “All specialist branches were liberally sprinkled with lads from the paper town…(including)…A. Martinuk, Engineers.”
412 - Maslin, G.E.H. (Gil) – Private Canadian Army Overseas
- Apr/43, p.5 - “Recent enlistments around town include…Gil Maslin…”
- Aug/43, p.1 - “Gil Maslin…will probably be looking up the boys along the Strand very shortly.”
- Jan/44, p.2 - “So too (is) (in the Central Mediterranean)…Gun. Gil Maslin (#1 Coy 8
th Btn #2 CBRD)…”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.12 – “The Divisional troops, Artillery, Service Corps, Tank Brigade, etc., have Gnr. Gil Maslin…”
- Mar/44, p.4 - (in a letter from Maurice Wilshire) “At one place here I met…Gil Maslin…”
- Jul/44, p.1 – “Thanks also to Gil Maslin for the attractive and novel “Fall of Rome” letter.”
- Jul/44, p.2 - “Quite a number of the boys have visited Rome, including…Gil Maslin – and most of the gang say “I’ll take Riverside.”
- Sep/44, p.1 – “Gunner Gil Maslin (K-50857) is eating and drinking well with the 61
st Battery 8th Field Regiment (SP) in Italy.”
- Dec/44, p.1 – “Special acknowledgements to Gil Maslin for that choice Tedeski leaflet.”
- Feb/45, p.3 – “…I still can’t figure out these cigarettes. On November 11 received 900 from the Italian Depot and yesterday another 900 from the BC House in London…Enclosed latest Tedeschi propaganda leaflet.”
- Apr/45, p.3 – “…Haven’t had much mail since leaving Italy…Have some nice beer over here but it doesn’t come up to the old Pilsener standards. Meantine, my best to the old town.”
- Jun/45, p.2 – “Gil Maslin (is) reported back home and…will likely head for the Pacific.”
- Jul/46, p10 - “All specialist branches were liberally sprinkled with lads from the paper town…(including)…Gil Maslin, Artillery.”
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413 - Matheson, C.D. (Con) – Trooper Canadian Army Overseas
(PH002292)
- Vol.18/1942/No.2-Feb. p.8 – “Heading the list [of brother combinations] are the three husky Matheson boys…Overseas, with the 16th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery is Rod Matheson; and somewhere in England in the 9th Armored Regiment is brother C.D. Matheson. The third of the trio, N.P. Matheson, is with the Air Force in an eastern Canadian camp.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.8 – “In the Ninth Armoured Regiment (BCD) of the same division (is) C.D. Matheson…”
- Apr/43, p.2 – 9
th Armored Reg’t “A thousand thanks for the smokes. These are the first I’ve received in the past three months. By that you can realize how much they are appreciated. Seems my luck has been out as far as cigs. Go. Guess Davy Jones has a good supply anyway. I’m just like all the rest that left Powell River, never knew how much fun we had until we left.”
- Jan/44, p.2 - “So too (is) (in the Central Mediterranean)…Trooper Con Matheson (9th Armored)…”
- Vol.20/1944/No.2-Feb. p.12 – “The 9
th Armored Regiment recently arrived in the Mediterranean area…Some of those identified include…Con Matheson…”
- Jul/46, p10 - “All specialist branches were liberally sprinkled with lads from the paper town…(including)…Trooper Con Matheson, Royal Armored Corps.”
414 - Matheson, Ken – Lance Corporal Canadian Army Overseas
- May/43, p.2 – “Ken Matheson has his first stripe as a member of the CFC.”
- May/43, p.5 - “We thank the scores of boys who have written us and are only sorry we can’t include all your letters. We hope to get around to most of them some time. Meantime we would like to acknowledge letters from…Ken Matheson…”
- Nov/44, p.4 – B Squad 28
th Armored Regt (BCR) CAO “Had a visit from the press photographers last week, and if the cameras stand up to it, you may see us in one of the papers. Powell River was well represented; Howie Russell, Jimmy Stapleton, Perry Monsell, Major Barlow and myself. Perry and I had a trip back to Caen together, and managed to sample all of the different types of Belgian and French wines, beers and liquers during that trip.”
- Nov/44, p.4 – (in a letter from P.E. Monsell) “Ken Matheson has been with us right along. Right now, three of us are trying to write letters in the back of a truck. Brother Del is writing Mother, and Ken is trying to write on the same box as me, and shaking it so hard that I missed the paper in some places.”
- Nov/44, p.4 - “Had a visit from the press photographers last week, and if the cameras stand up to it, you may see us in one of the papers. Powell River was well represented; Howie Russell, Jimmy Stapleton, Perry Monsell, Major Barlow and myself. Perry and I had a trip back to Caen together, and managed to sample all of the different types of Belgian and French wines, beers and liquers during that trip.”
- Dec/44, p.2 – “Ken Matheson is out of the line indefinitely, with back trouble, but haven’t his address. You can still catch him at (K-41482) 28
th Armored Regt “B” Squad CAO “In Hospital”.”
- Feb/45, p.2 – “And Trooper Ken Matheson, after a spell in a Belgian hospital, is back with the 28
th Armored again, somewhere in Germany.”
- Jun/45, p.2 – “(A) casualty reported in recent weeks…Ken Matheson was in a shell explosion in Holland.”
- Jul/46, p.12 - “…and Ken Matheson (was) in the fight to close the Falaise Gap.”
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415 – Matheson, N.P. – RCAF
(PH002358)
- Vol.18/1942/No.2-Feb. p.8 – “Heading the list [of brother combinations] are the three husky Matheson boys…Overseas, with the 16th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery is Rod Matheson; and somewhere in England in the 9th Armored Regiment is brother C.D. Matheson. The third of the trio, N.P. Matheson, is with the Air Force in an eastern Canadian camp.”
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416 - Matheson, R.A. (Rod) – Sergeant Canadian Army Overseas
(PH002298)
- Vol.17/1941/No.5-May. p.10 – “Sergeant Bat MacIntyre and Gunner Rod Matheson of the Light Anti-Aircraft unit arrived safely in England after an uneventful voyage.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.2-Feb. p.8 – “Heading the list [of brother combinations] are the three husky Matheson boys…Overseas, with the 16
th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery is Rod Matheson; and somewhere in England in the 9th Armored Regiment is brother C.D. Matheson. The third of the trio, N.P. Matheson, is with the Air Force in an eastern Canadian camp.”
- Vol.18/1942/No.9-Sep. p.9 – “At Dieppe,…Sergt. Rod Matheson (was) in the attacking force…”
- Jul/44, p.3 – “Sgt. Rod Matheson is being invalid home. The big boy is very disappointed at not being able to go over with his unit, 16
th LAA Bty.”
- Aug/44, p.2 – “Latest advices indicate that Sgt. Rod Matheson is coming along fine and will probably remain in England.”
-Vol.21/1945/No.1-Jan. p.11 – “And from Ray Cormier, convalescing from wounds received in the Falaise Gap: “…And the other day in London I met Rod Matheson and Dick Stevens-and that called for a celebration.”
- Apr/45, p.2 – “Glad to report that Rod Matheson is in the “pink” again and stamping around the English countryside demanding to be sent back to his old unit.”
- Jul/46, p.9 – (re: Dieppe) “Rod Matheson, with the 16
th “Light Acks” facaed enemy airattacks and sniper’s bullets for over six hours.”
418 – Mathews, Henry – AB
- Vol.21/1945/No.6-Jun. p.15– “Another brother combination who met for a brief leave together were Leading Seaman Peter Mathews and A.B. Henry Mathews. Peter was on the Prince David from Normandy to Greece. His brother is on his way overseas.”
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419 - Mathews, A.M. (Tony) – OS RCNVR
(PH002132) (on left)
- Vol.18/1942/No.3-Mar. p.2/3 – “Working out of eastern ports, guarding convoys, hunting submarines or sweeping up mines, are lads who were born here, or who spent most of their lives in our midst…(including.)…Tommy Mathews…”
- Jun/45, p.1 - “Other fellows definitely signed up for the Pacific include…Tony Mathews.”
- Vol.21/1945/No.7-Jul. p.12– (photo caption) “Tony and Peter Mathews photographed at home in Cranberry. Peter has returned after 18 months overseas, including Normandy and Southern France landings. Tony has volunteered for the Pacific.”
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420 - Mathews, Peter – Leading Seaman RCNVR
(PH002132) (on right)
- Mar/44, p.3 - “And the Cranberry gang can find…Pete Mathews (A-391) by writing to 10 Haymarket St. London.”
- Jun/44, p.2 – “Peter Mathews of Cranberry, was aboard the
David.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.7-Jul. p.10 – “…on the
David was Ldg. Seamn. Peter Mathews.”
- Oct/44, p.5 – “Thanks for another load of fags just received…and Canadian smokes are sure a godsend…Just for your information, we are self-named Softball Champs of the Mediterranean. Have trounced the HMCS Henry recently…We listened in to the World Series, and most of us wondered how the Browns got in there at all…I really could go for some home leave about now. I used to curse that big hill running up from the jetty in P.R. but right now I’d go up it backwards, on my hands and knees with a 100 lb. pack on my back and like it.”
- Vol.21/1945/No.6-Jun. p.15– “Another brother combination who met for a brief leave together were Leading Seaman Peter Mathews and A.B. Henry Mathews. Peter was on the
Prince David from Normandy to Greece. His brother is on his way overseas.”
- Vol.21/1945/No.7-Jul. p.12– (photo caption) “Tony and Peter Mathews photographed at home in Cranberry. Peter has returned after 18 months overseas, including Normandy and Southern France landings. Tony has volunteered for the Pacific.”
- Jul/46, p.7 – (re: D-Day) “The Henry’d sister ship, the David, also carrying troops, had Peter Mathews on its crew list.”
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421 - Mawn, Art – Private Canadian Army Overseas
(PH002253)
- Apr/43, p.3 – 10th Coy CFC Overseas “Received the 1,000 cigarettes and also want to thank the company for the year’s suscription to the Powell River News. Have seen a few soccer games up here, but give me my old half back line of Small, Birt and Redhead, with Tommy Gardiner in gaol and we could give any of those smart Scottish amateurs a run for their money.”
- Mar/44, p.2 – “(to show you around Glasgow)…contact Art Mawn, Bob (Parkin). He has a wide acquaintance in the Gorbals and around the Gallowgate.”
- Jun/45, p.2 - “(A) casualty reported in recent weeks…Art Mawn was in hospital in Scotland recovering from a leg injury.”
422 - Menzies, G.M. (Gordon) – Lance Corporal Canadian Army Overseas
- Vol.18/1942/No.7-Jul. p.12 – “Several Powell River boys have landed safely overseas (including) Private Ray Menzies…”
- Aug/43, p.1 – “Gordon Menzies, with the Tank Transporters, has grabbed his first hook.”
- Aug/43, p.4 – (K-71239) 65
th Tank Transporters Coy RCASC “Please thank the P.R. Compamy for the 600 cigarettes which I received after a leave in Scotland. I came out with 91% in my examinations for NCO, which they tell me is one of the highest marks made in this course, so guess I can thank my Powell River education. And, oh yes, I had a look around Burn’s Monument. From all account he must have been quite a lad in his day. Also saw the house in which I was born. (…And, by the way Gord, Nick Stusiack just dropped in after a year in Alasska, and says to say hello.)”
- Feb/45, p.3 - “Claude Borden and Gordie Menzies still continue to meet for the odd jam session up in Holland.”
- Feb/45, p.4 – (in a letter from A.P. Holborne) “The other evening we went pub crawling, or whatever they call it in Holland and to my surprise ran smack into Claude Borden and Gorden Menzies. Sure were a sight for sore eyes, and – need I go further, or let you draw your own conclusions?
- May/45, p.2 – “And word just through that Gord. Menzies has taken time off to grab an English bride for the journey back home. Gord. Joins the almost 100-odd locals that have found their fate in the United Kingdom.”
- Jun/45, p.4bhj – “…Our Sgt. Major (the best in the Canadian Army) has just been playing us a few bugle calls on a bugle I gpt for him some time ago in France. It has quite a history. The Gerries got it when the British left Dunkirk and I got it when we went into Baillieull. I didn’t know then that he could play a bugle. Boy, what a mistake I made! But he is getting rid of it now as he is on his way to Canada. So in a few minutes I’m going to play a tune on it with a hammer…We have been helping the people to rebuild theiri swiiming pool and showers here at Arnhem, so we can go swimming whenever we please now…We have our own club in town, dancing orchestra and beaucoup beer every night.”
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423 - Messmer, E.F. (Gene) – Flying Officer RCAF Overseas
((PH002196)
- Jan/44, p.2 - “You probably saw most of the new arrivals at the Reunion… (including)…Gene Messer.”
- Feb/44, p.5 - (re: Reunion) “Liked the group (photo) with Bat MacIntyre, Walt Vandervoort, Lionel Rorke, Martin Naylor, Roy Lund, Gene Messmer, all in dignified relaxation.”
- Mar/44, p.5 – (Reunion Pictures) “We showed the pictures to four separate audiences, and at every performance we caught Margaret Messmer…coming back for more.”
- Vol.20/1944/No.3-Mar. p.13 – “And this list doesn’t include those local marriages like Gene Messmer and Margaret Hindle.”
- Jul/44, p.1 - “Gene Messmer (has) been boosted to Flying Officer.”
- Jan/45, p.2 – “Flying Officer Gene Messmer popped in (to Powell River to say hello).”
- Vol.21/1945/No.2-Feb. p.10– “…Flying Officer Gene Messmer…arrived home…Gene had completed his last operational tour in bombers…”
- Mar/45, p.6 - “A final flash that P.O. Gene Messmer…(has) received (his) final discharge.”
- Apr/45, p.2 – “Recent discharges include…Gene Messmer.”